I bought a 1010C dozer

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Hurlbutt
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I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Hurlbutt » Sat Mar 21, 2020 7:04 pm

I bought some property which the previous owner allowed several acres of thorn apple trees to take over. I don’t like repairing tires so decided to get a tracked machine for clearing operations and redoing the long driveway and I bought a 1010C with a 6 way blade and ripper. Having no experience in tracked equipment, all I knew to look for was sprockets with good teeth and pins that are round.

From reading on this site I’ve learned there's a lot to learn and I need a low pressure grease gun so asked my son about one (he has a Matco tool truck) but that’s not my immediate concern.

This unit was acquired by the last owner three years ago as a project from someone that “pop started” it because it was hard to start. The last guy assumed low compression problems and was going to give it a major overhaul but didn’t (might have found it was more $$ that he wanted to invest). I was thinking possible and/or low injection pump pressure or even glow plug issues if they are used (I haven’t read about any glow plugs yet). I suppose the starter may have been well fried because of hard starting problem.

The data plate on the side of the diesel engine looks to have been cleaned with hammer and chisel with very light impressions done at the factory. What I think is on it from Dubuque is 1010C 14829. It is equipped with grease type track adjusters instead of the big threaded rod and nut of the 1010C with loader which I also bought a couple days the dozer acquisition but questions on that with be in another posting.

There’s the background as I know it. Now the questions.

Looking for manuals, I see some designated for SNXXX and up and and others not so designated. The listing in the FAQs doesn’t show SN ranges as I recall. What should I look for? There is a package on eBay with tractor operator and parts, dozer operator and parts, and repair manual for about $110. Would that be the set to get?

What approach do you recommend to start working on this beast. My mechanical experience has been small to medium size agricultural tractors (gas and diesel), automotive and light trucks and aircraft, so I’m not a complete novice but never been on a crawler.

The rod end for the blade tilt ram is missing along with the pin. The rod appeasers to be threaded but has some ugly welding too. Should I start looking for a replacement ram or are rod ends available?

Since it’s been sitting for who knows how long, are the steering clutches going to be an issue?

What else can I expect?
Bill

B Town
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by B Town » Sat Mar 21, 2020 7:20 pm

I have read the glow plugs must be in working order and used. If you are concerned about the condition of the engine, it would be reasonable to check the compression. The steering clutches are the dry type, if the machine was stored outside the clutches are more likely to cause problems. I have been told these dry clutch machines must be protected from the weather/water. I have heard of owners tying the steering levels back, when in long term storage.

Always good to start with complete new fluids and filters.

Best regards,
Bruce

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Lavoy
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Lavoy » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:36 am

I agree with what Bruce said, total fluid an filter replacement end to end.
As far as starting, 1010 diesel needs to be glow plugged for 30 seconds on an 80 degree day, so I would check and/or replace all 4 glow plugs, and check wiring. Check and/or replace battery cables, starter, battery if any are questionable.
Manuals are a must have, parts and service especially, operators not a bad idea either. I would realistically not even start on anything til you had the manuals in your hand and had done some reading.
These old girls are not rocket science, but to a degree they are more voodoo than reality some times, and the experience of the people on here that have been there, done that can help with that portion. Fix it right the first time, not doing so will cost you a lot more money in the long run, and may save you buying an expensive/unobtainable part later.
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Parts and restoration for antique and late model John Deere crawlers.
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Hurlbutt
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Hurlbutt » Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:49 am

Once I get it on the concrete I shall inspect things in detail (might have done a better job before buying it but as long as there were no gaping holes in the casting and such the inspection detail wouldn't have mattered; I wanted it and wants makes all kinds of excuses for things). I saw the alternator had been removed and some rather crude bracket for it had been fabricated and the battery cables are trash. But I will wait on deep involvement until I have the appropriate manuals.

I plan on making an adapter for using my differential compression tester for aircraft to see if there are bad valves or blow-by before really cranking it over for a compression test. Knowing the valves and rings are reasonably good would make me feel better about replacing the oil and filter when the previous owner thought it needed an overhaul to run.
Bill

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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Lavoy » Mon Mar 23, 2020 12:39 pm

Needs to be about 400 psi gauge if I remember correctly.
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Hurlbutt
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Hurlbutt » Mon Mar 23, 2020 5:08 pm

Compression test with a differential compression tester is static. The piston is taken to the top of the compression stroke and 100 psi is applied into the cylinder through a calibrated orifice with a gauge on each side of the orifice. The difference in the supply gauge (100 psi) and the cylinder pressure gives a qualitative reading for each cylinder for finding poor cylinders. You can often find where the issues are by listening to air leakage at the exhaust and intake manifolds and the crankcase breather.

If things appear balanced between cylinders and the breather cap isn't blown off and so on, then fluids and filter and crank it over with the starter with the diesel compression tester. My boy who has the Matco truck basically told me I don't want a Matco unit. Too spendy. He doesn't stock them. Orders them on request. He told me some of his customers are happy with the Chinaharbor (HFT) kits. I was reading customer reviews on them and it don't sound good. Sometimes the oil doesn't leak from the gauge but they lack a check valve so they don't build pressure to a maximum, the gauge just bounces with each stroke. The bleeder o-rings are an issue often too. I might try one but they have a 20% restocking fee for those who return them. Adding a check valve isn't a challenge but leaky gauges don't sound good.
Bill

gaspumpsam
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by gaspumpsam » Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:04 pm

I think if you are building an airplane, or a $50000.00 race car engine, I think you are on the right track with your differential gauge compression tester. If you are working on 50 yr old 1010 crawler( or similar) I believe if you got a good old regular compression tester, you might find out all you need to know. Remove all injectors or spark plugs, screw in tester into #1 hole, rotate engine 5 complete revs( you can hear the cyl chuff, for ea revolution) record that reading then do same for ea cyl, you will find out all you need to know about that engine. If it’s a gas engine , make sure you open throttle wide open, and hold it open while doing test on each cyl. Just my way of doing compression tests for many years, and is a tried and true method.
Just my idea!

Hurlbutt
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by Hurlbutt » Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:04 am

The differential compression tester isn't rocker science, just a diagnostic tool I've used for years on aircraft. It is easy to use and doesn't require using the starter so the electrical system isn't needed. I don't have to redo the battery cables to do the test. At this time, I don't even know if the starter is any good. But, I can get a good idea of the engine's condition without doing a bunch of preparatory work only to find the engine has a hole in a piston or burned exhaust valve. The tester has been used on engines much older than this rather new '62 vintage engine, (The '46 Luscombe my dad had is still flying with that old Continental 65) although it will be the lowest power output unit. The process might be foreign to you but that doesn't invalidate it 's application here and uses the same orifices as the standard compression tester. Very little additional work to find more information than the standard test revels. If things look favorable, then it is time to get the starter functional and carry on.
Bill

gaspumpsam
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by gaspumpsam » Tue Mar 24, 2020 11:21 am

For sure!! If you have it( and sounds like you have) and you have used it and are familiar with it, defiantly use it.
Let us know what you found!

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gregjo1948
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by gregjo1948 » Wed Mar 25, 2020 3:02 am

I think the 1010 and 2010 were JD's first diesel engines. They did run a diesel in some of the 440s but they were a 2 stroke Detroit engine. Those engines would start quite well using starting fluid but, I don't recommend using starting fluid on the 1010 or 2010. I've heard that it's very apt to break the top ring. I had a 1010 for a few years and it was a bear to start. Even had to glow plug it for a minute in the summer. In the winter, I did use starting fluid but, I bypassed the air cleaner and would start cranking it over then, very sparingly, spray a light mist. If you spray the fluid into any air cleaner that is an oil bath, the fluid can load up in the oil and when the engine fires, it can suck too much in all at once and break things or if you're lucky, it'll just seize the engine for a while. If it seizes, it'll eventually free up and you can start all over.
JD 350B diesel 6way blade, Case 580B Loader/backhoe, Farmall 504 high crop w/ flail boom mower, International 404 , International 284 diesel w/belly mower, 1972 Ford F600 dump truck, Galion 3-5 roller, Allis Chalmers D17, 1620 Ford

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shinnery
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Re: I bought a 1010C dozer

Post by shinnery » Wed Mar 25, 2020 8:15 pm

Actually a R would have been Deeres first diesel, followed by the 720, 730, 820 and 830. The 10 series would have been their first 4 cylinder diesels.
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